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CSPAN
Oct 13, 2013 11:50am EDT
of modern science, scientific culture part of the ideological magnitude of the enlightenment. in his famous lectures on the roots of romanticism, isaiah berlin had the ideology in disarray. the view is there some nature of things such that if you know this nature in yourself and the relationship and understand the relationship between everything that composes the universe, then your goal rosales facts about yourself much become clear to rebut all these things that occur, but that there is such knowledge that is the foundation of the entire western tradition. to view is that of a jigsaw puzzle of which we must defend the fragments of the secret treasure, with which we must speak. the essence of this view is that there is a body of facts to which we must admit. sign this submission. science is being guided by the nature of things. scrupulous regard for what there is, not deviation from the fact understanding knowledge at tatian. my claim in the book is the message of narrow science is as much the same as that of so-called new atheist and the two should be considered together. the atheist spea
Al Jazeera America
Oct 12, 2013 1:30pm EDT
the intersection between hardware and humanity. we're doing it in a unique way. this is a show about science by scientists. so let's check our team of nerds. phil torres studies insects in the rain forest of ecuador and peru. tonight our real-life spider-man takes us to colorado where iron man comes to life helping one woman stand tall despite a devastating disability. this is an engineering who designed a buy bionic eye. this young man invented a test to predict cancer. i'm a science major with a background in neurology. that's our team, and now let's do some science. >>> we're back here at our favorite meeting place have been some coffee, and you guys did some incredible stories this week. it's interested to start out and hear about this exosuit for you, phil. >> the wheelchair was invented about 1500 years ago, so i'm sure we're due to an upgrade. this might be it, guys. check out this robot. this is where it's getting tested, but it's there on an actual person. i got to meet the test pilots that put these suits through their paces and some really amazing people. let's take a look. >> hi.
FOX
Oct 13, 2013 8:00am EDT
credit union. >>> new ideas and breast cancer winners and turning government funded science into medicine and today's affordable care update we will put insurance premiums for young americans on the map. i'm steve olsen. welcome to "biocentury this week." >>> since world war ii, government funded research has been the driving force behind an explosion of medical break throughs. but discoveries are only the beginning. it takes massive private sector investment, drug making expertise, and commercial risk to turn basic science into medicine. when the handoff from government funded research to industry is effective, the results can be break throughs. like drugs that turned hiv from a killer to a chronic condition. vaccines that prevent cervical cancer. a drug that prevents premature babies from a deadly respiratory infection and the first treatment to prevent the infection of cystic fibrosis. the successes are obvious. the question is how many potential medical advances are stuck in government funded labs. this week we will ask what can be done to turn more of this research into products that
WHUT
Oct 14, 2013 9:00am EDT
. >> you describe how the foundations of our knowledge, of life, of the sciences of life began in that 400 year period from christopher columbus to charles darwin. what was the question you wanted to have answered about it? >> well, as i said, curiosity had been proscribed. and europeans, hard to believe, europeans weren't very curious. they didn't travel much, they are very secure in the knowledge that they knew everything that was needed to know. and then they encountered these two continents and a cluster of islands in between them with this exotic flora, these strange animals, and even stranger people. and they didn't know what to think because their understanding of the cosmos was that there was adam and eve, there was noah's ark, and that contained the world's population. but where did these people come from? and this was such an insistent, it was really an imperative question. because they had to figure out whether -- how they were going to maintain their orthodoxy or maybe move outside of it. and a lot of them did move outside of it. >> you said they had to be blindsided when they
WHUT
Oct 11, 2013 8:30am EDT
a way to make it all work and make it happen. now we are going to talk about math and science, but first we want you to watch this is video of president obama visiting with the next generation of female scientists and engineers. >> the belief that we belong on the cutting edge of innovation, that's when ideas as old as america itself. it's in our dna. we know that what these young people are going, that is what is going to make a difference in this country over the long haul. >> i created a nano particle that's like eye swiss army knife of camp treatment. >> i uv lunch box that kills bacteria off fruits and food. >> building a detection method for buried land mines. >> the natural colors versus the white jeans in sheep genetics. >> blue tooth enabled heart monitor to detect a medical emergency and notify, contact where you are, what happened, what going on, where they can find you. >> we created a a an adaptive hd device for a girl in georgia. >> did you play it or design the game? >> i design it had. >> geez. that's pretty impressive. >> it's young people like you that make me so confid
WHUT
Oct 11, 2013 7:00am EDT
of women training in science and technology. that's a theme that's also being addressed by the u.n. today in what they've called the day of the girl child. here are some recent statistic on women in the technology industry, they make for interesting reading. in 2010 only 15% of u.s. computer science undergraduates were female. only 10% of internet entrepreneurs across the world are women. and yet 30% of the best paid jobs for women are in the technology sector. so, to discuss how we can get more girls, and young women interested in science and technology, i'm joined by belinda palmer who is c.e.o. of lady geek, an agency that makes technology more accessible to women and girls. i'm also happy to say we've got a 13-year-old student and a participant in one of those miss geek campaigns. i'm going to get to the part of that in a moment here. but i'll start with you, belinda. is this really necessary? do you need to work very hard to get young women into science and technology? interested in it? >> absolutely. in the u.k., only 17% of the technology workforce is female, that's bad enough and
PBS
Oct 15, 2013 5:30pm EDT
quarterback in the trunk of the car. >>> the days of having to go to the science theater to see a movie is ancient history. we take a look at some of the options. >> gravity was one of the biggest movies of the weekend, raking in over $55 million at the box office. with lots of 3d imax screenings, it was literally the biggest movie of the weekend playing on extra large screens across the country. several movie goers paid extra to see it. the film's director said east max inspired him when making the movie. >> i can't see you anymore. >> but there are two different kinds of imax screens and chances are you saw gravity on the not so good kind. when you think imax, you think giant screens, screens that are several stories tall. over the last several years imax has been slapping their names on screens that are slightly bigger than a traditional screen instead of building them specifically like the ones at science centers, they're retrofitting existing theaters. critics call these lie max but they make up the bulk of them. for example, there are nine imax theaters in arizona but only three a
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2013 12:00am EDT
science foundation, which i cherish, the thousand 970 are not there. so not yet. this is my statement and who should i call on? >> the witnesses? >> absolutely. >> we spoke so eloquently. this is unprecedented behavior. >> all right, and let me do that and we will start with the dubber honorable deborah hirschman and the president executive officer, the former head of the federal aviation administration and doctor alan leshner. including the executive publisher of science magazine. captain keith coburn, owner and operator, am i right? >> absolutely. and rachel weintraub and senior counsel of the consumer federation of american. deborah hirschman, may we please don't use. >> yes, sir. >> good afternoon, members of the committee. i appear before you today to discuss the effect of the federal government shutdown on the mission of the national transportation safety board. on october 1 oh 2013, the ntsb delivered furlough notices to 383 of our 405 employees. our contingency plan following a lapse in appropriations provides that all activities of the ntsb be shut down, except for those nece
NBC
Oct 13, 2013 9:00am PDT
democratization of knowledge. we look forward to add the scale of machines, the wonderful science that get done on it. and effect, the benefit to man kind. >> are there countries you're not supposed to send these chips to? is there a standard list? >> we operate under the us export control regulations. >> the xeon 5 that you make, which are state-of-the-art, they are okay to ship. >> yes. >> to china, et cetera. >> yes. >> what is this particular computer being used for in china? >> we believe -- and i have seen some examples of where this is used for very exciting new discoveries in life sciences, in modeling of large-scale systems from weather systems to financial systems. and so, as the scale of machine, what it really enables is discovery of models in kind of manipulation of things that we couldn't do before. >> but this one, i had to notice in the china defense technology institute which probably suggests it's not being used for those things. they can be used for model nuclear explosions. how sensitive is that? or should we not care? ie, everyone should be able to have this stuff? >> i can
MSNBC
Oct 7, 2013 7:00pm PDT
about the history. evto earn degrees in mathan stand science.ut but more than half leave their programs. so we're missing out on 450,000 math and science graduates annually. but if we can help students prepare for these subjects we'll have a stronger workforce for our fastest-growing industries. let's invest in our future. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. so i can't afford to have germy surfaces. but a fresh sheet of bounty duratowel leaves this surface cleaner than a germy dishcloth. it's durable. and it's 3 times cleaner. so ditch your dishcloth and switch to bounty duratowel. so she could take her dream to the next level. so we talked about her options. her valuable assets were staying. and selling her car wouldn't fly. we helped sydney manage her debt and prioritize her goals, so she could really turn up the volume on her dreams today... and tomorrow. so let's see what we can do about that... remodel. motorcycle. [ female announcer ] some questions take more than a bank. they take a banker. make a my financial priorities appointment today. b
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2013 6:00pm EDT
that science committee ranking member johnson intends to include remarks in the congressional record and i want to thank her for her support of national laboratory employees. the speaker pro tempore: without bjection, so ordered. mr. swalwell: mr. speaker, i came to congress knowing that in the policies i help and work to enact and the legislative agenda i would work on that i could either help people or hurt people. and the decision for me was quite easy, mr. speaker. i came to congress to help people. i came to congress to think big. i was very excited when i was told prior to being sworn in that i was going to be serving on the science committee. i was even more thrilled when i learned that i would have the opportunity to serve as the lead democrat on the energy subcommittee knowing that the energy subcommittee would have partial jurisdiction over two national laboratories which are in my congressional district in livermore, california, lawrence livermore national laboratory and sandia national laboratory. these two national laboratories, about 1,600 at livermore and 500 at sandia work every
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2013 1:00pm EDT
science experiments that cannot happen. one of the things our committee has done is to compile, and you of you, onn front government shutdown. it is 29 pages long. it could be 2900 pages long. a more human account of what is not happening. i ask unanimous consent of this report be made a part of the record. by ais is a report majority staff of the committee, is that correct? i just haven't seen it. i have no objection. >> i now call on senator wicker look like senator to me but is. that because of the unprecedented blizzard in south dakota, he felt like he .eeded to get back to his state when he heard about this hearing to try to make travel arrangements to get back but it -- that he has been unable to do so. i am sure he would have liked to been here. we wish him a speedy return in which the people of south dakota the best during this disaster. know and most of the public is aware, republican members have been meeting in the white house with president obama and vice president biden. lasted longer than people expected. i guess that is a good thing. we were talking about this very subjec
Al Jazeera America
Oct 9, 2013 8:00pm EDT
of popular science magazine and he is here with us from the planetarium at the lawrence hall of science at the berkley campus in california. jake it's thank you for being here. thanks for being here. thank you john good to be here. >> tell us about this sling shot. >> how did it work? >> the gravitational pull of the earth is knife to pick up momentum and harness it. you can't get to 650,000 miles an hour without using it. as you say it passed over south africa this afternoon gaining 165,000 miles an hour speed which will send it on it's way to jupiter. >> when did it launch from earth and what has it been doing until this sling shot? >> what is amazing about the juneau program for the last two years it's been gaining momentum using the gravity of the sun and it's done a full rotation of the sun and using the gravity of erlt to pick up another burst of speed as if you had atathed another rocket to it. it's going to take another three years to get to jupiter. >> when it gets to jupiter what will happen then? efnl well in mythology the good jupiter covered himself in a cloud, a vale of cl
PBS
Oct 12, 2013 12:00am PDT
's interesting is all three of the winners of the award started off doing fundamental basic science. they then started a company and one of the functions of the company was to help them do their science better. it supported the science. so this is a beautiful example of interaction between university and by technology for the benefit of both. it's really a model of how this should be done. >> rose: a look at the brain and hearing loss for the hour. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> what happened? what happened? >> hi, jade! i, jade! >> is that mom you're hearing? yes! what happened? >> mama! >> right. i understand! uh-huh! it opened up. >> rose: helen keller once said "blindness separates us from thing but deafness separates us from people." hearing loss affects 48 million americans. that is 15% of the population. most of those cases are currently untreated. in recent years there have been break throughs in the treatment of hearing loss. ingeborg hochmair helped pioneer development of the cochlear implant. t
PBS
Oct 12, 2013 4:00pm PDT
about science. >> the second-place winner... >> you can almost feel the tension as the contestants wait to hear the winning names announced. >> from ambler, pennsylvania, and germantown academy, jonah kallenbach. [ applause ] >> this might seem like the oscars, but these winners are scientists. the intel science awards recognizes high-school seniors who solve real-world problems. for example, jonah took second place for taking on the challenge of a dangerous kind of protein. >> i basically built a computer-science tool, which solves this problem by predicting exactly when a disordered protein is going to bind to an older protein, and what that interaction looks like. >> let me translate -- jonah is on track to finding a better way to treat cancer. as for the first-place winner... >> sara volz. [ applause ] >> ...her project focused on using algae for fuel. >> i feel like there were so many deserving people, and, like, all of the people who i got to meet this week are so smart, and their projects are so amazing that... i'm really stunned and honored and amazed. >> all this excitement hap
NBC
Oct 7, 2013 5:30pm PDT
credited with saving a lot of lives. u >>> and raising the bar. first in the nation in math and science. now outperforming most of the world. tonight an american success story. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. they are known as special operators for good reason. they are the members of the u.s. armed forces who move around in the shadows and pull off the missions not thought possible. this weekend in two near simultaneous missions almost 3,000 miles apart, u.s. special operators target the two u.s. overseas operatives, terrorists that the u.s. had been following and targeting for some time. the first raid was in libya. the second was in somalia. the target in the first raid was seized by members of the army's delta force. but something happened in the second military action. something unforeseen and members of the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. team 6 had to pull out as quickly as they arrived. our chief foreign correspondent richard engel just back from that part of the world is here with us in our studio tonight. a busy weekend for special operators. >> reporter: it certainly was. we
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2013 8:00pm EDT
. the national science foundation which i cherish 1970 of 2000 not there. that concludes my statement and who should i call on? are we in order of arrival? go to the witnesses? say mr. chairman you spoke so eloquently. >> this is unprecedented behavior. [laughter] let me do that then. we are going to start with the honorable deborah ap hersman. i didn't know the ap was there but i do now. chairman of the national safety board and the honorable marion blakey president and chief executive officer of aerospace industries association former head of the federal aviation administration. dr. alan leshner the chief executive officer of the american association for the advancement of science and executive publisher of science magazine. captain keith colburn alaskan fish and owner and operator fp -- am i right? and legislative director and senior counsel consumer federation of america. deborah hersman maybe start with you please? the good afternoon chairman rockefeller and members of the committee. i appear before you today to discuss the effect of the federal government shutdown on the mission of the
Al Jazeera America
Oct 13, 2013 7:30pm EDT
team, now let's do some science. [♪ music ] >> hi, guys, we are back here at "techknow" for another week of amazing stories and screen and innovation. we'll get started with this "heart in a box." check it out, this is an actual beating heart outside of the body. this is seriously the most amazing thing i've ever seen and touched. let's check out the story. >> when it comes to heart transplants, it's always a race against time. we've all seen it on tv. when a donor heart becomes available, medical teams must move quickly. the organ is removed and preserved by placing it in ice. the heart must arrive at the recipient's hospital within six hours that's because the ice damages the heart making it unfit for transplant. in this will keep hearts warm and beating. this will be a major break through in transplant history. the first human transatlantic took place in a hospital in south africa in 1967. since then it has become a fairly routine proceed cur proch 2,000 happening in the united states. there is one aspect to the process that has remained the same. yep, getting the heart from poin
Comedy Central
Oct 7, 2013 7:00pm PDT
-- well, then i give up. (laughter) so i am giving a wag of the finger to the "new york times" science writer ashley merryman for an op-ed she wrote last week entitled "losing is good for you." well, if you really feel that way, ms. merryman, great news, i think you're a loser. (laughter) merryman here claims america has gone trophy crazy, especially when it comes to our kids and that after years of researching the effects of praise on kids "the science is clear: awards can be powerful motivators but non-step recognition does not inspire children to succeed, instead it can cause them to underachieve." wrong! (laughter) wrong! this country was built on awards. what do you think gave washington the confidence to defeat the british? it was his fourth grade most improved karate participation profy! (laughter) listen up! listen up, the "new york times." i know what's going on here. you published some liberal j.d. about awards being terrible and losing the s the best right after i win these. (cheers and applause) skrao *ed. (cheers and applause) clearly, clearly, clearly somebody is jealous.
NBC
Oct 8, 2013 5:00pm PDT
here to the bay area for a weekend of fund raising, but a political science professor says cancelling was the right thing to do. she was supposed to arrive for two different fundraisers on saturday. one for one kings lane and then a resituatiception -- on sunday minority leader was the host the first lady at a bigger event at the fairmont here in san francisco. these are privately funded events not costing any government resources, but a political science professor says it really is all about how it looks. >> i think right now with everyone worried about the shutdown and how long it is going to last and what effect it is going to have, but to act like things are normal, it looks like the party is not focused enough. >> reporter: bay area democrats are not the only ones who are disappointed about the first lady's change of plans. she was supposed to attend a fundraiser in l.a. still the political science professor says the parties are not going to miss out on any of this fund raising. they'll do them down the road. many of the political action committees are raising money quietly based
NBC
Oct 8, 2013 6:30pm EDT
. every year american students earn degrees in math and science. but only three in ten of them are women. to have enough graduates to fill 21st century jobs... ...we'll have to solve this gender divide. let's inspire more young women to pursue math and science. let's light the way for a new generation. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. afghanistan in 2009. on the u.s.s. saratoga in 1982. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve current and former military members and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, relief is at hand. for many, nexium provides 24-hour heartburn relief and may be available for just $18 a month. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrh
WUTB
Oct 12, 2013 12:00am EDT
a whole laboratory up here. saul was a student of science. he was a great help with the leather glues and dyes for the shop. well, whatever he was cooking up, it certainly creates a right pong. be careful with that. who knows what these chemicals are? any idea what these scribblings are about? i left school to learn my trade at 15. simon here would know more about these things than me. uncle chaim makes the best shoes in melbourne. he cared for saul like his own son. you mentioned the kabbalah. the kabbalic teachings try to divine the nature of the universe, the essence of life itself. this is where he tore the page. may i keep this? of course. [ bells ring ] excuse me. a customer. do you know if saul had a girlfriend? i doubt his religious studies left time for that. you might be surprised. a perfect match for your brooch. i thought it lost. where did you find it? under saul michael's bed. were you having a dalliance with saul? that is none of your business. phryne: for goodness sake, woman, i'm trying to save you from the gallows. yes. we were lovers. the others, his friends, knew n
Al Jazeera America
Oct 9, 2013 11:00pm EDT
and chief of "popular science" imagine deamagazine. he is with us from the berkle by campus. >> tell us about this sling shot, how did it work? >> the gravitational pull of the earth is enough to pick up my momentum and haa harr harness i. as you say it passed over south africa this afternoon and gaining 165,000 miles-per-hour of speed which is going to send it on it's way to jupiter. >> when did it launch from earth and what have you been doing since this sling shot? >> what is amazing about the juneau program, for the last two years since it's launch in august of 20 he is. 2011 it's been gaining momentum and it's using the gravity of the earth to pick up another burst of speed. if you had attached another rocket to it. the past two years have been about picking up speed and it's going to take three years to get to jupiter. >> when it gets to jupiter, what will happen then? >> well in mythology the good jupiter covered himself in a veil of cloud and his wife june juneau was the only one that could see through them and see his true nature we ar. we are going to look inside of the veil o
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2013 6:00am PDT
.th and science. to have enough graduates to fill 21st century jobs... ...we'll have to solve this gender divide. let's inspire more young women to pursue math and science. let's light the way for a new generation. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. exciting and would always come max and pto my rescue. bookstore but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and they both loved the taste. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i got my hero back. purina cat chow healthy weight. >>> today a special election. it's a week from today. there was a time when the mayor corey booker looked like a singe to win the election. frankly win a full years. he's still the favorite to beat the republican, but first he appears to be limping to the finish line. a poll out shows booker a little ahead among likely voters. boy, it was a lot bigger when the race started. it's partly his own fault
FOX
Oct 8, 2013 5:00am EDT
moment of my life... so far." an 11-year-old's science project... could change space travel as we know it. why nasa is sending his experiment... into orbit. ((break 2)) an 11-year-old in colorado wants to boldly go whe no child has gone before. he's brewing a beer that can be used in space. as he tells mark meredith, this experiment has nothing to do with getting astronauts drunk. this is how we cruh them. following a recipe usually meant for adts... (nats) michal bodzianowski,t age 11, is turning beer making into a historic achievement. "i really didn't expect this from the start, i just designed this experiment to get a good grade in my class" but his idea is earng him a lot more than a goodrade. his experiment... to see how the fermentation process works in cro gravity... is grabing the attention of nasa. "beer while known to most people as a party drink actually has some medical properties" in december, michal's idea will leave the classroom and arrive at the international space station. it's there astronauts will find out how well the beer ferments in space... something the 7th grade
CBS
Oct 8, 2013 12:00pm EDT
academy of sciences awarded the prize after a highly unusual one-hour delay. the academy called the discovery a triumph for theoretical physics and research. >> the royal swedish academy of sciences didn't explain the delay in its announcement. the group tweeted its committee was still in session when the original announcement time came and went. >> >>> still ahead -- a brisk you a -- autumn day coupled with clouds. the forecast coming up. ,,,,, >>> enjoy the little bit of sunshine while you can because we'll have more cloud cover headed our way and even some rainfall in the forecast. we'll get to that in a minute. for the meanwhile we're cooler than we were yesterday. sitting at 62 degrees at bwi marshall. all of us in the 60s with the exception of oakland at 52 degrees. dew point 44. and locally seeing temperatures in the low to mid-60s. 51 westminster. 63 degrees in bel air. winds from the north and we've got some breezy conditions particularly among the bay. we have a small craft advisory in effect through 6:00 p.m. tonight. winds 12 miles per hour out of the north at b
PBS
Oct 11, 2013 7:00pm EDT
somebody who knows something about science, about science fiction, for that matter. you need to have a history buff. you need to have a movie guy. >> players say this is a brain workout. >> i think it sharpens my brain now. now, i started answering the questions. and i have faith in my intuition. >> there's no google, no texting. >> all of your friends are already here. for "the list, i'm jake peter. from trivia to late night. we can find you the day's best in the news. if we default on that, they need to take your craft by kids. >> i can take this picture, bring it over here and take this lady who's been evacwaiting from a hurricane zone and put it over here. >> it's incredible. move around in images of devastation with a flick of his controller. it's like he's playing wii tragedy. >> this will be a huge benefit to the 14 million people in l.a. who suffered from glaucoma. >> the great hall weenl costume in the purple crayon. >> give them mouth to cookie. so, um, do you want to come up for a coffee? yeah. 'kay... uh... good. so... so, uh... you make yourself at home and i'll be... ye
CNBC
Oct 15, 2013 3:30am EDT
a revolutionary new supplement called cognivance, born out of cutting-edge science and clinical research. this little capsule can not only help promote overall health. it may help reduce the incidence of certain cancer. it can even help improve our cognitive function, improve our memory, and help us stay able to access everything that's stored in our brains. are you ready to take charge of your health? [ applause ] thank you. and welcome to the new "living well with montel." you know, today we're talking about the vital role supplements play in our health. supplements have been around for a long time. the problem is most of them were formulated more than 50 years ago, and a lot has changed in a half a century. now, would you really want to use something that's 50 years old? you wouldn't rely on a 50-year-old car, or you wouldn't want to watch tv on something this old, right? or what about a cellphone? would you rather use this one or one like this? the answer's obvious. so, why would you trust your health to a 50-year-old supplement that might be doing you more harm than good? we're abou
MSNBC
Oct 7, 2013 10:00pm PDT
in tenents of them are women.th and science. to have enough graduates to fill 21st century jobs... ...we'll have to solve this gender divide. let's inspire more young women to pursue math and science. let's light the way for a new generation. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. make my mark i wawith pride.ork. create moments of value. build character through quality. and earn the right to be called a classic. the lands' end no iron dress shirt. starting at 49 dollars. i've got a big date, but my sinuses are acting up. it's time for advil cold and sinus. [ male announcer ] truth is that won't relieve all your symptoms. new alka seltzer plus-d relieves more sinus symptoms than any other behind the counter liquid gel. oh what a relief it is. >> in tonight's rewrite, i will show you exactly how many words in a john boehner sentence you have to change to make it true. that's next. stick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the flexcare platinum. new from philips sonicare. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love
CBS
Oct 13, 2013 7:00pm PDT
at the intel international science fair with his invention. like a modern day rocky, this self-described science geek took the stage and $100,000 in prize money. pure, unadulterated adolescent joy. when you won the intel award, your reaction went viral on the internet, correct? >> jack andraka: yes, yes, it did. ( laughs ) >> safer: it's a no-joke award. >> jack andraka: i wasn't expecting any awards there. then, when i won, i was just flabbergasted. i was, like, freaking out. i was just like, "what?" >> safer: yes, you were. >> jack andraka: "me?" >> safer: jack andraka's journey from suburban baltimore high school freshman to cancer researcher began at age 14 when a family friend died of pancreatic cancer. shocked that there is no reliable early test for the disease, jack decided he would develop one. he began probing the internet for everything he could find about pancreatic cancer biomarkers. he read research articles during class, and in the middle of biology, while stealthily reading a medical journal, he says inspiration hit. the teacher was not amused. >> jack andraka:
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2013 8:00pm EDT
our national laboratories has produced some tremendous results in science. i just want to go through some of them. the gentleman from california talked about nonproliferation and what the research has done at the national laboratories as far as reducing the stockpiles across the world. well, because of the ldrd work, what we have seen is that we are able to better test nuclear weapons and verify countries and the numbers they're claiming they have for nuclear weapons across the world because we have this ldrd research. we provide cleaner energy vehicles. the chevy volt, for example. the chevy volt would not be able o cruise on battery power. also rblings airport security, we are thankful and grateful that at the airport, they are able to detect many of the explosives that terrorists would seek to use to take down an airplane. ld rmp d we can thank them that makes our airports so much safer. i was a prosecutor for seven years and so many cases, whether homicides or sexual assaults, we were able to put perpetrators away because of d.n.a. research conducted at our national labor
Al Jazeera America
Oct 7, 2013 8:00pm EDT
, specifically about basic science research and funding. can you talk about that? >> yeah, sure. my work benefited by investment by the federal government, the nih, the national science foundation, even though i never gave practical reasons why this work would be important. it was merely because of my convictioning that understanding basic cellar processes would be crucial to technological advancement. and yet both the decision-making in washington in support of the nih budget and even within the nih i'm afraid tends to favor practical applications at the expense of basic science. i would wish that the federal government would restore funding to the nih, and the nih would recognize the value of basic undirected science. >> does the shutdown effect any of this? >> absolutely. base all all of my resources come from private sources. but my colleagues here and elsewhere are crucially dependent on the nih, the sequester and now the shutdown has had a dramatic effect. we're losing scientists who are moving back to their countries a abro abroad, and this is stripping basic advance in science. >
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2013 10:00pm EDT
that people dare i say in the sciences like my apple computer i'm glad i've got a polio vaccine. but nonetheless, nonetheless, we are in the position to do this. it's a particularly rich acquisition and it seems to me that it is worth in itself the only justification for the humanities the would be enough. though we do more than that as well. we in the humanities help our students and help ourselves to do what socrates said we ought to do and that is quite simply to know ourselves. at the humanities are for the students what they like to call the great second chance. that is we all get socialized one time by our parents and teachers and by our religious instructors and we learn who is they think we are in for a while who we think we are. we learned about the world is, what's valuable, what's not valuable and how we ought to leave our lives. by the time you're 17-years-old we've been described multiple times by multiple people and those descriptions may or may not be accurate. but when you go to college and you get to study the humanities, you get what i would call the great seco
CBS
Oct 12, 2013 8:00am EDT
. he is a science teacher. he coaches the varsity cross country team. >> for the first time in more than a decade it could be a baltimorean who wins the baltimore marathon. for the first time it is the baltimore favorite. no title sponsor this year. last year 100,000 dollars in had prize money attracted elite runners from around the world. now this is truly a long love of sport event. people who run and they run -- it's truly a solitaire resport. running is something you can only do by yourself. today you do it by yourself with the company of 27,000 others. this is the baltimore running festival, there are runners from all 50 states and countries but it doesn't attract the elite runners any more. >> before the title sponsor pull out and took the purse with it baltimore has the 9th largest purse in the country in terms of marathons. the ninth most prize money. we thought over the years as the purse grew it was one of the world class events in terms of marathoning the hope is this will be a title sponsor back next year. you ask anybody in the back of the pass they did
CNBC
Oct 9, 2013 11:00pm EDT
the mcgregors, 'cause we love chex. evto earn degrees in mathan stand science.ut but more than half leave their programs. so we're missing out on 450,000 math and science graduates annually. but if we can help students prepare for these subjects we'll have a stronger workforce for our fastest-growing industries. let's invest in our future. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. find out more at aflac.com. >>> alcoa may have been booted from the dow jones average unceremoniously, but it shouldn't be booted from its status as a bellwether for you because the company has more to say about the state of t
CNBC
Oct 13, 2013 11:00pm EDT
degrees in math and science. to have enough graduates to fill 21st century jobs... ...we'll have to solve this gender divide. let's inspire more young women to pursue math and science. let's light the way for a new generation. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. and better is so easy withrning you cabenefiber.o something better for yourself. fiber that's taste-free, grit-free and dissolves completely. so you can feel free to add it to anything. and feel better about doing it. better it with benefiber. [stopwatch ticking] >> the federal reserve is the lifeblood of the banking system. its 12 regional banks are clearinghouses for commercial banks. this is one of the vaults associated with the reserve bank in new york. robots carry cash in the vault that is as big as a football field and four stories high. each pallet loaded with $100 bills is worth $64 million. the fed has 22,000 employees. it clears your checks and your atm withdrawals and provides economic forecasts. but one of its most important responsibilities is regulating the nation's biggest ban
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2013 9:00am EDT
by operating off prior year funding while most of the department of energy's science and energy laboratories have enough carryover funding to operate through november. the national security laboratories and stockpile production sites of the nnsa are not in the same position, in that same position. this week, the nnsa sites began notifying workers that they'd be shutting counsel as early as october 17 to -- shutting down as early as october 17 in order to protect nuclear materials. by the end of the month, 90% of personnel at our nuclear weapon sites may be laid off, halting work to keep our nuclear weapons reliable. . once laid off some of these vital workers may never return. suspending an ongoing nuclear production operation is no simpletask. that interruption will lead to higher costs and only make it more difficult to maintain an aging stockpile. we must act now to prevent disruption of these important national security activities. we must also sustain the critical work that the nnsa's nonproliferation experts perform overseas. despite hopeful press reports, iran has not turned off its c
MSNBC
Oct 8, 2013 8:00am PDT
is a practically pint-sized houdini. every year american students earn degrees in math and science. but only three in ten of them are women. to have enough graduates to fill 21st century jobs... ...we'll have to solve this gender divide. let's inspire more young women to pursue math and science. let's light the way for a new generation. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? chantix... it's a non-nicotine pill. i didn't want nicotine to give up nicotine. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. [ mike ] when i was taking the chantix, it reduced the urge to smoke. [ male announcer ] some people ha
MSNBC
Oct 10, 2013 1:00pm PDT
doctor if chantix is right for you. i don't smoke. evto earn degrees in mathan stand science.ut but more than half leave their programs. so we're missing out on 450,000 math and science graduates annually. but if we can help students prepare for these subjects we'll have a stronger workforce for our fastest-growing industries. let's invest in our future. join exxonmobil in advancing math and science education. let's solve this. >>> we're awaiting a meeting of republican congressional leaders, including speaker john boehner at the white house with the possibility of a thaw over the government shutdown. one wonders if the gop will play nice on the affordable care act, something jon stewart did not do when interviewing health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius this week. >> the obama care is for the 15%ers. >> for the 15% who have no insurance at all. >> i see. how many have signed up thus far? >> fully enrolled? >> yeah. >> i can't tell you. because i don't know. >> well, we do know in the first week of open enrollment, more than 8 million americans visited health care.gov, gli
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